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HARTH is now a PATH International Member Center and is offereing a new therapeutic riding program for special needs clients.

Horse Assisted Therapy for Veterans

"As prey animals, horses are hypervigilant until they learn they are not in danger. ... Because of their own hypervigilance, veterans with PTSD easily understand and can relate to the trust and hypervigilance in a horse."  Read more about Horse Assisted Therapy.

What is the advantage of using horses?

Horses are very social animals and tend to mirror what human body language is telling them.  Horse assisted counseling has been successfully used both nationally and internationlly in effectively treating PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication problems, behavioural issues,  and many more mental and emotional issues.  The programs at HARTH do not involve riding horses and all work with the horse is done from the ground.  Activities may invovle grooming, leading the horse, grazing, navigating obstacles etc.   Working with a horse involves teamwork and respect and focuses on action, not speaking.  Horses respond to nonveral communication and this approach can be much more effective with veterans than 'talk therapy'.  Veterans in our programs learn to work on their relationship with the horse and not 'controlling' the horse.  And, horses don't judge. 

Do any of the programs involve horse riding?

All the programs at HARTH Foundation work with the horse from the ground. 

Is there a cost to participate in any of the programs offered?

The programs offered are free to all veterans and active servicemen and servicewomen.   The costs for the progarms are covered by the generosity of our sponsors and supporters.

Who can particapte in the programs?

The programs are offered free to any veterans or active duty service members. 

How do I volunteer?

Check out our 'Volunteer" page.  Still need more information?  Contact us directly!  We'd love to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy has been used nationally and internationally as an effective treatment. President Obama has allotted funds for Veterans rehabilitation. Horses work well in this type of therapy. They are very social animals, much like humans. Horses “mirror exactly what human body language is telling them and therefore provide us with metaphors and lessons about ourselves to help facilitate change.” (Trask, 2010)1

Some of the mental health issues that can be addressed are: PTSD, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, communication needs, behavioral issues, attention deficit disorder, and , eating disorders,. For Veterans, this treatment can be very beneficial.

The program is not about riding horses or learning horsemanship, this is an experiential psychotherapy program done from the ground. There are activities that the Veterans work with the horses to perform. Some of the tools that are used in the activities are long poles, noodles (long foam tubes) and small cones. Depending on the goal of the Veteran, the tools are placed and the Veteran is given a task to perform with the horse. The process involves teamwork, leadership, creative thinking and problem solving. Many of the people participating in EAP form a close bond with the horses. This approach to therapy is considered to be a short term approach.

The program focuses on action, not talking. The horses respond to nonverbal communication, which can be much more effective than traditional “talk therapy”. Horses are able to assist the Veteran with their communication. The program encourages the participants to find solutions to problems by learning to rely on themselves and team members. During the exercise, the participants can encounter frustrations that they experience similar to what they deal with outside the program and by working with the horses, they learn to adjust and overcome the frustrations. Veterans in the program learn to work on a relationship with the horse and that they cannot “control” the horse. The Veterans feel accepted and not judged by the horses.

- See more at: http://www.montana.va.gov/features/Equine_Therapy_Program.asp#sthash.RoPiG9Ed.dpuf